Coronavirus Updates

The President’s Coronavirus Guidelines for America: 15 Days to Slow the Spread

 

  Scam Alert - Public Health will not use text messages to notify people that they may have been exposed to COVID-19.

On March 13, 2020 the President declared a National Emergency to help combat the spread of COVID-19 across the United States, for the latest US case count visit the CDC's website.

Montgomery County is also experiencing a rise of cases around the county with the first confirmend case being reported on Wednesday, March 18, 2020. For updates on cases throughout Ohio visit the Ohio Department of Health website. Visit Ohio Department of Health COVID-19 website


Public Health - Dayton & Montgomery County Orders

What happens if a case is reported?

  • A case or suspected case of the Coronavirus COVID-2019 is reported to a local health department.
  • ODH reports to the CDC and, if indicated, patient specimens will be collected and shipped.
  • Currently, testing for this virus must take place at CDC.
  • ODH will work with local, state, and federal partners to investigate reports of Coronavirus COVID-2019 in order to identify cases and prevent the spread of infection.

Current Public Health Actions Have Included:

  • Public Health sent a Health Alert to the Greater Dayton Area Hospital Association to have them forward to healthcare professionals within the county and region.
  • A media release was generated and shared with the West Central Ohio Region Health Departments
  • An interview was done with the Dayton Daily News explaining the role Public Health plays during a Public Health emergency.
  • Public Health is coordinating with the Dayton Fire Department to develop and forward an informational bulletin to EMS.
  • Public Health will continue to monitor the situation and if warranted we will activate the Incident Management Team.

Public Health Orders March 22, 2020

Stay At Home Order Frequently Asked Questions

The order will take effect at 11:59 p.m. EDT on Monday, March 23rd

The director’s order includes the entire state. Unless you work for an essential business or are doing an essential activity, you should stay home. Work from home is permitted and encouraged where possible.

This order is mandatory. To help prevent the further spread of COVID-19 in Ohio and protect our friends, neighbors, and vulnerable populations, please stay home.

No. The Ohio National Guard will not be enforcing this order.

Law enforcement officials will not stop residents who are on their way to or from work or who are out for necessities like going to the pharmacy or getting groceries, or just taking a walk. People gathering in any size group may be asked to physically distance themselves or go home. Ohioans should abstain from all nonessential activities. Adhering to the order will save lives and it is the responsibility of every Ohioan to do their part. We are in this together.

Yes, essential services will still be operational including, but not limited to:

  • Grocery stores
  • Gas stations
  • Pharmacies
  • Police stations
  • Fire stations
  • Hospitals, clinics and healthcare operations
  • Garbage/sanitation
  • Public transportation
  • Public benefits (i.e. SNAP, Medicaid) hotlines

If you are feeling sick, call your doctor, a nurse hotline, any telehealth hotline set up specifically for COVID-19 (check with your insurance company) or an urgent care center. If you are experiencing symptoms or are currently in isolation, you should stay at home and follow the guidelines provided by your physician. Do not go to an emergency room unless necessary. Nonessential medical care like eye exams and teeth-cleaning should be postponed. When possible, healthcare visits should be done remotely. Contact your healthcare provider to see what tele-health services they provide.

Unless your work is an essential function (i.e. healthcare provider, grocery store clerk, first responder), you should stay home. If you have been designated essential by your employer, you should continue to go to work and practice social distancing. If you are experiencing symptoms or are currently in isolation, you should stay at home and follow the guidelines provided by your physician.

Essential businesses will remain open during the Stay at Home order to provide services that are vital to the lives of Ohioans. Those businesses include, but are not limited to, pharmacies, certain government offices, and restaurants providing take-out meals. If you work for an essential business, you should continue to practice social distancing and should stay at home outside of work hours. If you believe your business is nonessential but are still being asked to show up to work, you may discuss with your employer.

Yes, grocery delivery will be available as well as meal-delivery, drive through, and take-out options.

Public transportation and ridesharing should be used for essential travel only. When possible, walk, or drive yourself.

No, the roads will not be closed in Ohio. You should only travel if it is essential to your work or health.

Planes and any other form of travel should only be used for essential purposes.

If it is not safe for you to remain home, you are able and urged to find another safe place to stay during this order. Please reach out so we can help. You may call the Ohio Domestic Violence Hotline at 800-934-9840 or contact your local law enforcement.

For your safety, as well as the safety of those in your community, you should remain at home to help fight the spread of COVID-19. However you may travel to care for elderly, minors, dependents, persons with disabilities, or other vulnerable persons. If possible, it is recommended that you drop off supplies, food, and medication to those relatives in need of assistance, but minimize interaction.

You may walk your dog and seek medical care for your pet should they require it. Be sure to practice social distancing while out on walks, maintaining at least 6 feet from other neighbors and their pets.

Families will still be able to go outside, including to parks and outdoor spaces that remain open, and take a walk, run, or bike ride but should continue to practice social distancing by remaining 6 feet away from other people. Playgrounds are closed because they pose a high risk of increasing transmission.

Social distancing is an important first step in preventing the spread of a disease like COVID-19 that allows people to go about their daily activities while taking extra health and safety precautions. The Stay at Home order requires people to remain in their homes unless they have an essential job or are doing an essential task like going to the grocery store or walking a pet.

Yes. Outdoor exercise like running or taking a walk is perfectly acceptable; however, exercise gyms, fitness centers and associated facilities are closed to reduce the spread of coronavirus. While exercising outside, you should still practice social distancing by running or walking at least six feet away from other people.

Yes. Many districts and schools are continuing to support students by providing breakfast and lunch in non-congregate settings. To find a meal site near you, use the Ohio Department of Education’s interactive map or check your local district’s website or social media channels for meal distribution locations and times.

Yes. Laundromats, dry cleaners and laundry service providers are considered essential businesses that will remain open.



Many County facilities are now closed to in-person transactions. Citizens seeking assistance and services are encouraged to use these virtual and phone options to get help:

Unemployment Benefits: unemployment.ohio.gov or 1-877-644-6562 (TTY service: 1-614-387-8408)

Job Seekers: (937) 225-JOBS (5627)

Medicaid, Food Assistance, Temporary Cash Assistance: www.ssp.benefits.ohio.gov or 937-225-4148
Or live chat with a caseworker between 2 and 4 p.m., Monday-Friday, by clicking on the In Contact icon on the Family Assistance page at www.mcohio.org

Medicaid only: 1-844-640-6446.

Water and Sewer Bills/Customer Service: www.mcohio.org/water or (937) 781-2688

Solid Waste and Recycling Services: www.mcswd.org
Please note that solid waste (trash) services are still available during reduced operating hours, but that special recycling programs are suspended until further notice.

Report Child Abuse or Neglect: 937-224-KIDS (5437)

Child Support: jfs.ohio.gov or 937-225-4600 (10 AM - 4 PM, M-F). Child Support payments can be made at oh.smartchildsupport.com.

County Recorder: Documents may be deposited into a dropbox for processing on the First Floor of the County Administration Building, or sent via mail to 451 W. Third Street, Dayton, Ohio 45422, 5th Floor. Title searches may be conducted online at www.mcrecorder.org. Call 937-225-4275 for assistance.

Vital Statistics (Birth/Death Records): www.vitalchek.com or 937-496-3117

Miami Valley Warmline

Electronic Death Certification

Ohio physicians have the ability to electronically complete and sign/certify the cause of death for Ohio records in our Electronic Death Registration System (EDRS). The funeral home electronically creates a death record, enters the personal demographic information, and selects a physician for the medical portion. At that point the physician may log in to EDRS from any location and electronically enter the same information previously handwritten on the paper certificate and then electronically sign/certify the record. Physicians can also provide a notification email address to receive alerts that they have a death record awaiting their signature.

pdf Electronic Death Certification Information (582 KB)

pdf E-Physician User Support Document (230 KB)

pdf E-Physician Clerk User Support Document (211 KB)


Find a Doctor
Program & Service Updates

How to Prepare

Here is what you can do to prepare your family in case COVID-19 spreads in your community.
  • Find Local Information

    Know where to find local information on COVID-19 and local trends of COVID-19 cases.

  • Know the Signs & Symptoms

    Know the signs and symptoms of COVID-19 and what to do if symptomatic:

    • Stay home when you are sick
    • Call your health care provider’s office in advance of a visit
    • Limit movement in the community
    • Limit visitors
  • Take Steps for Those at Higher Risk

    Know what additional measures those at higher risk and who are vulnerable should take.

  • Protect Yourself & Family

    Implement steps to prevent illness (e.g., stay home when sick, handwashing, respiratory etiquette, clean frequently touched surfaces daily).

  • Create a Household Plan

    Create a household plan of action in case of illness in the household or disruption of daily activities due to COVID-19 in the community.

    • Consider 2-week supply of prescription and over the counter medications, food and other essentials. Know how to get food delivered if possible.
    • Establish ways to communicate with others (e.g., family, friends, co-workers).
    • Establish plans to telework, what to do about childcare needs, how to adapt to cancellation of events.
  • Stay Informed About Emergency Plans

    Know about emergency operations plans for schools/workplaces of household members.

Information Guides - How to Prepare

How to Protect Yourself

Older adults and people who have severe underlying chronic medical conditions like heart or lung disease or diabetes seem to be at higher risk for developing more serious complications from COVID-19 illness. Please consult with your health care provider about additional steps you may be able to take to protect yourself.

Know How it Spreads

Cover Mouth
  • There is currently no vaccine to prevent coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19).
  • The best way to prevent illness is to avoid being exposed to this virus.
  • The virus is thought to spread mainly from person-to-person.
    • Between people who are in close contact with one another (within about 6 feet).
    • Through respiratory droplets produced when an infected person coughs or sneezes.
  • These droplets can land in the mouths or noses of people who are nearby or possibly be inhaled into the lungs.

Take steps to protect yourself

Wash Hands
Clean your hands often
  • Wash your hands often with soap and water for at least 20 seconds especially after you have been in a public place, or after blowing your nose, coughing, or sneezing.
  • If soap and water are not readily available, use a hand sanitizer that contains at least 60% alcohol. Cover all surfaces of your hands and rub them together until they feel dry.
  • Avoid touching your eyes, nose, and mouth with unwashed hands.
Home Quarantine
Avoid close contact

Take steps to protect others

Stay Home
Stay home if you’re sick
Cover coughs and sneezes
Cover coughs and sneezes
  • Cover your mouth and nose with a tissue when you cough or sneeze or use the inside of your elbow.
  • Throw used tissues in the trash.
  • Immediately wash your hands with soap and water for at least 20 seconds. If soap and water are not readily available, clean your hands with a hand sanitizer that contains at least 60% alcohol.
Wear a facemask if you are sick
Wear a facemask if you are sick
  • If you are sick: You should wear a facemask when you are around other people (e.g., sharing a room or vehicle) and before you enter a healthcare provider’s office. If you are not able to wear a facemask (for example, because it causes trouble breathing), then you should do your best to cover your coughs and sneezes, and people who are caring for you should wear a facemask if they enter your room. Learn what to do if you are sick.
  • If you are NOT sick: You do not need to wear a facemask unless you are caring for someone who is sick (and they are not able to wear a facemask). Facemasks may be in short supply and they should be saved for caregivers.
cleaning a counter
Clean and disinfect
  • Clean AND disinfect frequently touched surfaces daily . This includes tables, doorknobs, light switches, countertops, handles, desks, phones, keyboards, toilets, faucets, and sinks.
  • If surfaces are dirty, clean them: Use detergent or soap and water prior to disinfection.

Novel Coronavirus COVID-2019 advice for the public: Myth busters

Symptoms

Reported illnesses have ranged from mild symptoms to severe illness and death for confirmed coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) cases.
*This is based on what has been seen previously as the incubation period of MERS-CoV viruses.
Symptoms fever.
Symptoms fever.
symptoms shortness of breath

Watch for symptoms

Reported illnesses have ranged from mild symptoms to severe illness and death for confirmed coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) cases.

The following symptoms may appear 2-14 days after exposure. *

  • Fever
  • Cough
  • Shortness of breath

If you develop emergency warning signs for COVID-19 get medical attention immediately. Emergency warning signs include*:

  • Difficulty breathing or shortness of breath
  • Persistent pain or pressure in the chest
  • New confusion or inability to arouse
  • Bluish lips or face

*This list is not all inclusive. Please consult your medical provider for any other symptoms that are severe or concerning.

About COVID-19

Know the facts about coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) and help stop the spread of rumors.

Call your doctor: If you think you have been exposed to COVID-19 and develop a fever and symptoms, such as cough or difficulty breathing, call your healthcare provider for medical advice.
  1. Diseases can make anyone sick regardless of their race or ethnicity.

    Fear and anxiety about COVID-19 can cause people to avoid or reject others even though they are not at risk for spreading the virus.

  2. For most people, the immediate risk of becoming seriously ill from the virus that causes COVID-19 is thought to be low.

    Older adults and people of any age who have serious underlying medical conditions may be at higher risk for more serious complications from COVID-19.

  3. Someone who has completed quarantine or has been released from isolation does not pose a risk of infection to other people.

    For up-to-date information, visit CDC’s coronavirus disease 2019 web page.

  4. There are simple things you can do to help keep yourself and others healthy.
    • Wash your hands often with soap and water for at least 20 seconds, especially after blowing your nose, coughing, or sneezing; going to the bathroom; and before eating or preparing food.
    • Avoid touching your eyes, nose, and mouth with unwashed hands.
    • Stay home when you are sick.
    • Cover your cough or sneeze with a tissue, then throw the tissue in the trash.
  5. You can help stop COVID-19 by knowing the signs and symptoms:
    • Fever
    • Cough
    • Shortness of breath

    Seek medical advice if you

    • Develop symptoms

    AND

    • Have been in close contact with a person known to have COVID-19 or if you live in or have recently been in an area with ongoing spread of COVID-19.
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