COVID-19 Update

Vaccination Information


[Updated 10/28/21 11:00 am]
Notification will be made through local media and Public Health's social media channels when other booster doses are available.

COVID-19 Vaccination Information

A free $100 gift card will be awarded to individuals receiving their first dose. Ohio residents only.
Please bring a valid photo ID to allow Public Health staff to verify in its system which dose you are receiving. While Supplies Last

[Vaccine Myths vs. Facts]
[Fact Sheet COVID-19 Vaccine Booster Doses]
 
[Frequently Asked Quesions COVID-19 Vaccine Booster Doses]

Upcoming COVID-19 Vaccination Clinics

The following clinics will provide COVID-19 vaccinations of 1st, 2nd, immunocompromised and booster doses for qualifying individuals by appointment only.
Schedule an appointment below by choosing "Register" for the location needed  or call 937-225-6217

We are experiencing technical diffulties with our registration site. We are working to resolve the issue with our vendor,
and hope to correct the issue as quickly as possible.

    • Thursday, Oct. 28
      1:00 pm - 5:00 pm (by appointment only)
      Montgomery County Fairgrounds
      Register

    • Friday, Oct. 29
      8:00 am - 12:00 pm (by appointment only)
      Northwest Recreation Center
      1600 Princeton Dr.
      Register

    • Saturday, Oct. 30
      9:00 am - 12:00 pm (by appointment only)
      SugarCreek Packing
      900 N. Gettysburg
      Register

    • Wednesday, Nov. 3
      9:00 am - 1:00 pm (by appointment only)
      Dayton Convention Center
      22 E. Fifth St.
      Register

    • Thursday, Nov. 4
      1:00 pm - 5:00 pm (by appointment only)
      Dayton Convention Center
      22 E. Fifth St.
      Register

    • Friday, Nov. 5
      8:00 am - 12:00 pm (by appointment only)
      Northwest Recreation Center
      1600 Princeton Dr.
      Register

All individuals who received the Johnson and Johnson dose are elligible for a booster dose 2 months after their first dose.

Who Is Eligible For Moderna or Pfizer/Comirnaty Booster Doses?
Those currently eligible for a Pfizer/Comirnaty booster dose, at least six months following completion of their primary Pfizer series, include:

  • People 65 years and older or residents in long-term care settings SHOULD receive a booster shot.
  • People ages 50 to 64 with certain underlying medical conditions
  • SHOULD receive a booster shot.
  • People ages 18 to 49 with certain underlying medical conditions MAY receive a booster shot based on their individual benefits and risks. The CDC has indicated that this is a determination made by the vaccine recipient.
  • People age 18 and older who are at increased risk for COVID-19 exposure and transmission because of their job or living in an institutional setting MAY receive a booster shot based on their individual benefits and risks. The CDC has indicated that this is a determination made by the vaccine recipient. At this time, booster doses are authorized only for fully vaccinated Pfizer vaccine recipients who are at high-risk for exposure to COVID-19 or the complications from severe disease.

Those immunocompromised individuals who qualify for an additional COVID-19 vaccine dose include:

  • Immunocompromised individuals who meet certain, specific criteria and received an mRNA vaccine (either Pfizer or Moderna) are already eligible for a third dose at least 28 days after the second dose to strengthen the initial immune response. 
  • Individuals undergoing active cancer treatment (solid tumor and hematologic malignancies).
  • Individuals who have received a solid-organ transplant and are taking immunosuppressive therapy.
  • Individuals who have received a CAR-T-cell or hematopoietic stem cell transplant (within two years of transplant or taking immunosuppression therapy).
  • Individuals with moderate or severe primary immunodeficiency (e.g., DiGeorge syndrome, Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome).
  • Individuals with advanced or untreated HIV infection. 
  • Individuals undergoing active treatment with high-dose corticosteroids (i.e., ≥20mg prednisone or equivalent per day), alkylating agents, antimetabolites, transplant-related immunosuppressive drugs, cancer chemotherapeutic agents classified as severely immunosuppressive, tumor-necrosis (TNF) blockers, and other biologic agents that are immunosuppressive or immunomodulatory.

Additional Information

  • A parent or guardian must be with youth ages 12 to 17 during the vaccination.
  • Open to Ohio residents ages 12 and over when using the Pfizer vaccine and 18 and over when using Moderna or Janssen by Johnson & Johnson .
  • Individuals under the age of 18 must have permission from a parent or guardian who must be present during the vaccination.
  • Face masks must we worn while receiving services from Public Health
  • There is no cost to receive a vaccination from Public Health and we do not bill your insurance company.
  • For information about the timing of your second dose visit CDC's 2nd Dose Webpage

 






Other options for COVID-19 vaccinations:

Additional Vaccination Information

  • Public Health will provide notice on a weekly basis regarding vaccination opportunities.
  • The amount of vaccine and the schedule may vary week by week as supply fluctuates.

 Vaccination Information in a County Near You


As of December 3, 2020, in the United States, two COVID-19 vaccines have submitted applications for emergency use authorization (EUA) from the Food and Drug Administration (FDA). If granted, the vaccine could arrive in Ohio in limited supply for distribution to initial critical populations in December 2020.

Operation Warp Speed is a partnership between the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services and the Department of Defense to help develop, produce, and distribute millions of vaccine doses for COVID-19 as quickly as possible while ensuring that vaccines are safe and effective. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) is focused on vaccine planning, working closely with the Ohio Department of Health and other state partners to prepare for vaccination availability.

Getting us through the pandemic requires using all the tools available. Vaccines boost your immune system so it will be ready to fight the virus if you are exposed. Other steps, like masks and social distancing, help reduce your chance of being exposed to or spreading the virus. Together, the coming COVID-19 vaccines and proper prevention measures will offer the best protection from COVID-19.

Multiple COVID-19 vaccines are under development. As of November 24, 2020, large-scale (Phase 3) clinical trials are in progress or being planned for five COVID-19 vaccines in the United States. As of December 3, 2020, two vaccines have applied for emergency use authorization (EUA) from the FDA.

The two vaccines that have applied for emergency use authorization each require two doses. There is a vaccine in development and Phase 3 clinical trials that uses one dose. Ohioans who receive a dose of a particular vaccine must receive a second dose of the vaccine from the same manufacturer. For example, if you receive a first dose of the Pfizer-BioNTech vaccine, your second dose must be the Pfizer-BioNTech vaccine. If you receive a first dose of the Moderna vaccine, your second dose must be the Moderna vaccine.

The U.S. vaccine safety system ensures that all vaccines are as safe as possible. Safety is a top priority while federal partners work to make a coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) vaccine(s) available. Clinical trials study the effectiveness of the vaccine in thousands of study participants. Data from these trials will be provided to the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) to determine vaccine safety and effectiveness. The FDA uses rigorous standards during the evaluation and if it determines that a vaccine meets its safety and effectiveness requirements, it can make these available by approval or emergency use authorization. After FDA makes its determination, the Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices (ACIP) will review available data before making final vaccine recommendations to the CDC. There have been no shortcuts in the vaccine development process. The COVID-19 vaccine development process involved several steps comparable with those used to develop other vaccines, such as the flu or measles vaccine.

The federal government is committed to providing free or low-cost COVID-19 vaccines. Vaccine doses purchased with taxpayer dollars will be given to Ohioans who choose to receive them at no cost.

When FDA first authorizes or approves the use of one or more COVID-19 vaccines in the United States, there may be a limited supply. This would mean that not everyone will be able to be vaccinated right away but, in time, as vaccination production ramps up, every Ohioan who chooses may receive a vaccine as soon as large quantities are available.

No.

At first, there will be a limited supply of COVID-19 vaccine. The federal government will work to get those first vaccine doses out once a vaccine is authorized, approved, and recommended, rather than waiting until there are enough vaccines for everyone. However, it is important that the initial vaccines are given to people in a fair, ethical, and transparent way. Those who are at highest risk of contracting and transmitting the virus will be among the first to be able to access vaccination.

Initially, there will be a limited number of vaccines available, and Ohio is committed to making it widely available, for those that want to receive it, as quickly as possible as shipments of vaccine arrive. In conjunction with the recommendations of medical experts at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s (CDC) Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices (ACIP) and the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine (NASEM), Ohio has identified who will be among the first to receive those very early shipments in Phase 1A, should they choose to be vaccinated, listed below.

  • Healthcare providers and personnel who are routinely involved with the care of COVID-19 patients.
  • Residents and staff at nursing facilities.
  • Residents and staff at assisted living facilities.
  • Patients and staff at psychiatric hospitals.
  • People with intellectual disabilities and those with mental illness who in group homes or centers and staff at those locations
  • Residents and staff of Ohio’s veterans homes.
  • EMS responders.

Vaccine manufacturers are working hard to manufacture and distribute vaccines safely, quickly, and effectively. Each state will be informed, on a weekly basis, of how many vaccine doses they will receive that week.

We are working closely with vaccine providers and local health departments at this time to determine the best process for eligible audiences to use during the initial vaccination phase. During Phase 1A, the following providers will be responsible for distributing vaccines to the following audiences:

  • Essential workers in healthcare settings – hospitals and health systems.
  • Long-term care/nursing home residents and staff – CVS and Walgreens.
  • Congregate care staff and residents, EMS first responders, any remaining long-term care facility staff – local health departments.

Initially, there will be a limited number of vaccines available, so we are committed to making it widely available, for those that want to receive it, as quickly as possible as shipments of the COVID-19 vaccines arrive in Ohio. Ohio continues to make plans for a way to distribute vaccines in a way that is fair, ethical, and transparent, in conjunction with the recommendations of medical experts at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s (CDC) Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices (ACIP) and the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine (NASEM). As more information becomes available on who can receive the vaccine when, we will communicate this information publicly including through the news media and share information at coronavirus.ohio.gov/vaccine.

As vaccine supply increases, Ohio will be able to continue to vaccinate Ohioans who choose to receive the vaccine. The speed at which Ohio will move through the phases is largely dependent upon the number of vaccines available.

Once a vaccine is available, there will be guidance on who should receive it from the vaccine manufacturer. The bottom line is that Ohioans should be able to obtain safe, effective vaccines for themselves and their families if they choose according to manufacturers’ guidelines once it is widely available.

Not enough is known about how long natural immunity lasts for those that have recovered from the virus. Until we have a vaccine available and know more about natural immunity to COVID-19, the CDC will not comment on whether people who had COVID-19 should get a COVID-19 vaccine. The CDC Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices (ACIP) will make recommendations to CDC on who should get a COVID-19 vaccine.

Other vaccines, such as those for flu, measles, or other diseases, will not protect you from COVID-19. Only the vaccines designed specifically to protect you from COVID-19, once approved for use by the FDA, can prevent COVID-19. While a flu vaccine will not prevent you from getting COVID-19, it can prevent you from getting influenza (flu) at the same time as COVID-19. Because the flu viruses and the virus that causes COVID-19 will both be spreading during this time, getting a flu vaccine will be more crucial than ever.


Source: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC)
Updated Dec. 4, 2020
For additional information, visit coronavirus.ohio.gov.
For answers to your COVID-19 questions, call 1-833-4-ASK-ODH (1-833-427-5634).

Your mental health is just as important as your physical health. If you or a loved one are experiencing anxiety related to the coronavirus pandemic, help is available 24 hours a day, seven days a week. Call the COVID-19 CareLine at 1-800-720-9616.

Myth: COVID-19 vaccines aren’t safe.

FACT: COVID-19 vaccines are safe and effective.

Safety is a top priority of the U.S. vaccine safety development and approval process. The development process for COVID-19 vaccines involved several steps comparable with those used to develop other vaccines such as the flu or measles vaccine, which have successfully protected millions of Ohioans for decades. The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA), as well as independent medical experts, have ensured that every detail of COVID-19 vaccines is thoroughly and rigorously evaluated. Evidence shows that COVID-19 vaccines are safe and work to prevent COVID-19. Of the first two vaccines to apply to the FDA for emergency use authorization, the Pfizer BioNTech vaccine was 95% effective, and the Moderna vaccine was 94% effective in phase 3 clinical trials with more than 70,000 participants between the two studies. Although the COVID-19 vaccines themselves have been developed recently, the technology used in mRNA vaccines, like those developed by Pfizer BioNTech and Moderna, has been studied for decades.




Myth: COVID-19 vaccines were rushed and developed too quickly.

FACT: COVID-19 vaccine development and clinical trials were thorough and thanks to a strategic scientific effort to streamline processes, could be developed more efficiently.

There have been no shortcuts in the vaccine development process. The process has been quicker as a result of strategic efforts to run concurrent trial phases, as well as a commitment to help condense timelines and reduce or eliminate months-long waiting periods during which documents would be prepared or be waiting for review. In addition, during the process of vaccine development, the CEOs of AstraZeneca, BioNTech, GlaxoSmithKline, Johnson & Johnson, Merck, Moderna, Novavax, Pfizer, and Sanofi made a historic pledge to the world, outlining a united commitment to uphold the integrity of the scientific process as they work toward potential regulatory filings and approvals of the first COVID-19 vaccines. Messenger RNA (mRNA), used by the first two vaccines to apply for FDA emergency use authorization (Pfizer BioNTech and Moderna), while new, is not unknown. Researchers have been studying mRNA for decades, and early-stage clinical trials using mRNA vaccines have been carried out for influenza, Zika, rabies, and cytomegalovirus (CMV). Recent technological advancements in RNA biology and chemistry, as well as delivery systems, have allowed these COVID-19 vaccines using mRNA to be developed as safe and effective vaccines.




Myth: COVID-19 vaccines will be mandatory for every Ohioan.

FACT: Ohio will not make COVID-19 vaccination mandatory.

The state of Ohio will not require anyone to get the COVID-19 vaccine. The vaccine will be available to all Ohioans who choose to receive it, as available supply of the vaccine increases.




Myth: You can get COVID-19 from COVID-19 vaccines.

Fact: COVID-19 vaccines will not give you COVID-19.

None of the COVID-19 vaccines currently in development in the United States use the live virus that causes COVID-19. The Pfizer/BioNTech and Moderna vaccines are messenger ribonucleic acid, or mRNA, vaccines. (See below for further explanation.) The goal for COVID-19 vaccines is to teach our immune systems how to recognize and fight the virus that causes COVID-19. Sometimes this process can cause side effects, such as fatigue, headache, soreness or redness at the injection site, and muscle or joint pain.

These symptoms are normal and are a sign that the body is building immunity. It typically takes a few weeks for the body to build immunity after vaccination, and some vaccines require two doses. That means it is possible that a person could be infected with the virus that causes COVID-19 just before, or just after, getting the vaccination and become sick, since it takes the vaccine time to provide protection. Learn more about how COVID-19 vaccines work.




Myth: Vaccines that use mRNA will alter my DNA or genetic makeup.

FACT: Receiving an mRNA vaccine will not alter your DNA.

Messenger ribonucleic acid, or mRNA, is not able to alter or modify a person’s genetic makeup (DNA). The mRNA from a COVID-19 vaccine never enters the nucleus of the cell, which is where your DNA is kept, and therefore does not affect or interact with your DNA in any way. The mRNA from COVID-19 vaccines can most easily be described as a set of instructions for your body on how to make a harmless piece of “spike protein” to allow our immune systems to recognize that this protein doesn’t belong there and begin building an immune response and making antibodies. Essentially, COVID-19 vaccines that use mRNA work with the body’s natural defenses to safely develop immunity to the virus, giving your cells a blueprint of how to make antibodies. Learn more about how COVID-19 mRNA vaccines work




Myth: If I have recovered from COVID-19, I don’t need to get the COVID-19 vaccine.

FACT: People who have recovered from COVID-19 may still benefit from getting vaccinated.

At this time, experts do not know how long someone is protected from getting sick again after recovering from COVID-19. Due to the severe health risks associated with COVID-19, and because re-infection with COVID-19 is possible, people may be advised to get a COVID-19 vaccine even if they have been sick with COVID-19 before. The immunity someone gains from having an infection, called natural immunity, varies from person to person. Both natural immunity and vaccine-induced immunity are important aspects of COVID- 19 that experts are trying to learn more about, and the federal Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) will keep the public informed as new evidence becomes available.




Myth: COVID-19 isn’t very serious, so I don’t need to get the vaccine.

FACT: The severity of COVID-19 symptoms varies widely, and getting vaccinated can help prevent infection with COVID-19.

While many people with COVID-19 have only a mild illness, others may get a severe illness or die. There is no way to know how COVID-19 will affect you, even if you are not at increased risk of severe complications. Also, if you get COVID-19, you may spread the disease to friends, family, and others around you while you are sick. COVID-19 vaccination helps protect you by allowing your body to create an antibody response without having to experience sickness. Learn more about how COVID-19 vaccines work.




Myth: You will get a positive COVID-19 viral test if you receive the COVID-19 vaccine.

FACT: COVID-19 vaccines will not cause you to test positive on COVID-19 viral tests.

Vaccines currently in clinical trials in the United States won’t cause you to test positive on viral tests, which are used to see if you have a current infection. If your body develops an immune response, which is the goal of vaccination, there is a possibility you may test positive on some antibody tests. Antibody tests indicate you had a previous infection and that you may have some level of protection against the virus. Experts are currently looking at how COVID-19 vaccination may affect antibody testing results.




Myth: Other vaccines, like the flu shot, will prevent COVID-19.

FACT: Only vaccines designed specifically to prevent COVID-19 will protect you from COVID-19.

Other vaccines, such as those for flu, measles, or other diseases, will not protect you from COVID-19. Only the vaccines designed specifically to protect you from COVID-19, once approved for use by the FDA, can prevent it. While a flu vaccine will not prevent you from getting COVID-19, it can prevent you from getting influenza (flu) at the same time as COVID-19.




Myth: There will not be enough vaccines for everyone.

FACT: As production of vaccine continues to grow, every Ohioan who chooses to do so will be able to receive a vaccine to prevent COVID-19.

Initially, when the FDA first authorizes the use of specific COVID-19 vaccines in the United States, there will be a limited number of doses available. Ohio is committed to making the vaccine widely available, for those who want to receive it, as quickly as possible when shipments arrive in Ohio. In time, as vaccine production ramps up and large quantities are available, every Ohioan who chooses to do so will be able to get vaccinated.




Myth: COVID-19 vaccines will implant tracking microchips in people.

FACT: Vaccine injections do not contain tracking microchips.

No vaccine injections or nasal sprays – including the shots for COVID-19 – contain microchips, nanochips, RFID trackers, or devices that would track or control your body in any way. Much like the way any shipment or delivery is tracked, shipments of vaccine doses will be monitored as they are shipped and administered across the country. However, the notion that these shots will contain tracking devices implanted into Ohioans is false.




Myth: COVID-19 vaccines cause infertility or other serious medical problems.

FACT: No serious safety concerns have been observed for the COVID-19 vaccines that have applied for emergency use authorization.

In the Pfizer BioNTech phase 3 clinical trial of more than 43,000 individuals, and the Moderna Phase 3 clinical trial with 30,000 participants, no serious safety concerns were observed. The most common side effects were fatigue, headache, soreness or redness at the injection site, and muscle or joint pain. Side effects like these, while unpleasant, are a sign that your body is responding properly to create immunity from the virus that causes COVID-19.




Myth: Vaccines cause autism.

FACT: Vaccines do not cause autism.

Time after time, studies conducted across the globe continue to show that there is no connection between autism and vaccines.




How do I know which sources of COVID-19 vaccine information are accurate?

It can be difficult to know which sources of information you can trust. The internet, unfortunately, can be filled with dangerous misinformation about COVID-19 vaccines. The best thing you can do is educate yourself about the vaccines with trustworthy information. Learn more about finding credible vaccine informationin this article from the CDC at https://www.cdc.gov/vaccines/vac-gen/evalwebs.htm




Source: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), University of Maryland Medical System.

     
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