• Introduction:

    Mpox (formerly called Monkeypox) is a rare disease caused by infection with the Mpox virus. Mpox virus is part of the same family of viruses as variola virus, the virus that causes smallpox. Mpox symptoms are similar to smallpox symptoms, but milder, and mpox is rarely fatal. Mpox is not related to chickenpox.

    Mpox was discovered in 1958 when two outbreaks of a pox-like disease occurred in colonies of monkeys kept for research. Despite being named “monkeypox,” the source of the disease remains unknown. However, African rodents and non-human primates (like monkeys) might harbor the virus and infect people.

    The first human case of mpox was recorded in 1970. Prior to the 2022- 2023 global outbreak, mpox had been reported in people in several central and western African countries. After being detected in May 2022, U.S. mpox cases increased rapidly, peaking in August 2022. Infection in the United States has primarily spread person to person by close skin to skin contact. Although cases have decreased from their peak, mpox illnesses, including severe infections, continue to occur across the United States. Vaccination is an important tool in stopping the spread of mpox.

Mpox

Mpox (formerly called Monkeypox) is a rare disease caused by infection with the Mpox virus. Mpox virus is part of the same family of viruses as variola virus, the virus that causes smallpox. Mpox symptoms are similar to smallpox symptoms, but milder, and mpox is rarely fatal. Mpox is not related to chickenpox.

Mpox was discovered in 1958 when two outbreaks of a pox-like disease occurred in colonies of monkeys kept for research. Despite being named “monkeypox,” the source of the disease remains unknown. However, African rodents and non-human primates (like monkeys) might harbor the virus and infect people.

The first human case of mpox was recorded in 1970. Prior to the 2022- 2023 global outbreak, mpox had been reported in people in several central and western African countries. After being detected in May 2022, U.S. mpox cases increased rapidly, peaking in August 2022. Infection in the United States has primarily spread person to person by close skin to skin contact. Although cases have decreased from their peak, mpox illnesses, including severe infections, continue to occur across the United States. Vaccination is an important tool in stopping the spread of mpox.

JYNNEOS vaccine is approved for prevention of smallpox and Mpox. It is the primary vaccine being used in the U.S. during this outbreak.

Find a Mpox vaccine provider here or to schedule your Mpox Vaccine appointment call the Public Health Clinic at 937-225-4550

Those individuals who are ages 18 and up, residents of Ohio, and are any of the following:

  • People of any sexual orientation or gender identity who have or may have multiple or anonymous sex partners, or who participate or may participate in group sex
  • People of any sexual orientation or gender identity whose sex partners are eligible per the criteria listed above
  • People who know or suspect they have been exposed to Mpox in the last 14 days
  • Anyone else who considers themselves to be at risk for Mpox through sex or any other intimate contact.